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  1. #1
    Fundamental Thinker
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Western North Carolina
    Posts
    2,177

    Default Alliterated Sermon Outlines

    I was raised in an area where the measure of a pastors giftedness was his ability to alliterate sermon outlines and yell very loudly. Now, I'm no against either of those things, and am very much in favor of both of them. My question is, do you use (if you preach) alliterated outlines? If you don't preach then do you find them helpful, distracting, or aggravating or something else?

    Now I should state that I preach exclusively expositional sermons (not always through books but always taking the meaning of the text for the meaning of the sermon). I have always been under the impression that the main difference between an expositional sermon and a "running commentary" was the presence of a discernible outline.

    For whatever reason, I guess because alliteration is so huge in this area, I find myself alliterating outlines without thinking too much about it and I try (emphasis on try) never to force my alliteration into the passage. In other words I have a lot more 2 or 5 point sermons than I do perfect 3 point sermons with 3 sub-points each. I also work incredibly hard never to say, "Let me show you 3 things". I live and die by the key-word principle.

    Most of the time here lately I have just been alliterating my main points and not even having sub-points as part of an organized outline. I guess I am just wondering if I am wasting my time even trying to do this. A lot of great preachers do (did) use alliteration like Jerry Vines and John Phillips. I also notice that some guys, like John MacArthur, used to use it but have seemingly quit.

    Anyway, this long post was just a desire to see what most of the church represented here was used to using or hearing in their worship lives.

    For a reference here is my sermon outline for Sunday from 2 Corinthians 13:5.

    'Self-Examination'
    Propositional Phrase: Every believer must obey the solemn duty of self-examination which is governed by 3 "laws".
    Key-Word: Laws

    I. Self-Examination is Governed by the Law of Biblical Command
    A. Self-Examination involves Searching Self (examine)
    B. Self-Examination involves Showing Self (prove)

    II. Self-Examination is Governed by the Law of Biblical Criteria
    A. It is a Personal Exam (Yourselves)
    B. It is a Present Exam (Ye Be)
    C. It is a Profound Exam (In the faith)

    III. Self-Examination is Governed by the Law of Biblical Concern
    A. Paul's Concern for the Redeemed (That Christ is in you)
    B. Paul's Concern for the Reprobates (Reprobates)

    Thanks for bearing with me.

    He that changes pride for worldliness, sensuality for Pharisaism, vanity in himself to the contempt of others, let him not think that he hath mortified the sin
    that he seems to have left. He hath changed his master, but is a servant still. ~ John Owen

  2. #2
    Forum Sage
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    Nov 2005
    Location
    Casper, Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    22,398

    Default

    I find such (if faithful to the text) to be easy to remember and "pegs" to hang thoughts in people's minds. So I try to outline the paragraph, verse or phrase couched in simple words

    This Sunday (March 21) I will bring message 3 of 8 on the Lord's Prayer.

    I. PRIORITY OF GOD’S NAME
    Matthew 6:9c “Your Name be Hallowed.”
    A. FOCUS ON THE NAME OF GOD
    1. THE NAME OF GOD
    2. A TITLE IS NOT A NAME
    3. MORE THAN A TITLE

    B. FACETS OF GOD’S NAME
    1. GOD’S CHARACTER REVEALED IN THE OLD TESTAMENT
    2. GOD’S CHARACTER REVEALED IN THE NEW TESTAMENT
    II. PRIORITY OF SANCTIFYING GOD’S NAME
    Matthew 6:9c “Your Name be Hallowed.”
    A. FOCUS ON SACTIFYING GOD’S NAME
    1. UNDERSTANDING ARCHAIC ENGLISH
    2. UNDERSTANDING HONOR
    3. UNDERSTANDING SANCTIFICATION
    B. FACETS OF SANCTIFYING GOD’S NAME
    1. SANCTIFYING HIS NAME IN MY HEART
    2. SANCTIFYING HIS NAME BY MY KNOWLEDGE
    3. SANCTIFYING HIS NAME BY MY CONDUCT
    III. PRIORITY OF THE FIRST PETITION
    Matthew 6:9c “Your Name be Hallowed.”
    A. FOCUS ON THE PETITIONS
    1. POSITION AS FIRST OF SIX REQUESTS
    2. POSITION OF PRIORITY
    B. FACETS OF THIS PETITION
    1. REVEALING GOD’S RELATIONSHIP WITH MAN
    2. REVEALING MAN’S RELATIONSHIP WITH GOD
    Jesus knows me, this I love.
    'Dr. Bob' Griffin
    www.sovereigngracechurch.com
    www.grif.net


    "God elected me not because He looked ahead and fore-saw my faith,
    but because He looked ahead and fore-saw my unbelief."

  3. #3

    Default

    I love alliterated outlines. Easier to remember.

  4. #4
    Master of Fundamentalism
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    792

    Default

    Sometimes they make a sermon easy to remember. However, it's painful when you can tell a point was forced just to make the sermon alliterated.

  5. #5
    Like It, Love it, Gotta Have It
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    Nov 2005
    Location
    South of the border
    Posts
    5,261

    Default

    Ah always admired anyone able to alliterate accurately.

  6. #6
    Fundamental Thinker
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Summerville, GA
    Posts
    1,228

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Balance View Post
    I was raised in an area where the measure of a pastors giftedness was his ability to alliterate sermon outlines and yell very loudly. Now, I'm no against either of those things, and am very much in favor of both of them. My question is, do you use (if you preach) alliterated outlines? If you don't preach then do you find them helpful, distracting, or aggravating or something else?

    Now I should state that I preach exclusively expositional sermons (not always through books but always taking the meaning of the text for the meaning of the sermon). I have always been under the impression that the main difference between an expositional sermon and a "running commentary" was the presence of a discernible outline.

    For whatever reason, I guess because alliteration is so huge in this area, I find myself alliterating outlines without thinking too much about it and I try (emphasis on try) never to force my alliteration into the passage. In other words I have a lot more 2 or 5 point sermons than I do perfect 3 point sermons with 3 sub-points each. I also work incredibly hard never to say, "Let me show you 3 things". I live and die by the key-word principle.

    Most of the time here lately I have just been alliterating my main points and not even having sub-points as part of an organized outline. I guess I am just wondering if I am wasting my time even trying to do this. A lot of great preachers do (did) use alliteration like Jerry Vines and John Phillips. I also notice that some guys, like John MacArthur, used to use it but have seemingly quit.

    Anyway, this long post was just a desire to see what most of the church represented here was used to using or hearing in their worship lives.

    For a reference here is my sermon outline for Sunday from 2 Corinthians 13:5.

    'Self-Examination'
    Propositional Phrase: Every believer must obey the solemn duty of self-examination which is governed by 3 "laws".
    Key-Word: Laws

    I. Self-Examination is Governed by the Law of Biblical Command
    A. Self-Examination involves Searching Self (examine)
    B. Self-Examination involves Showing Self (prove)

    II. Self-Examination is Governed by the Law of Biblical Criteria
    A. It is a Personal Exam (Yourselves)
    B. It is a Present Exam (Ye Be)
    C. It is a Profound Exam (In the faith)

    III. Self-Examination is Governed by the Law of Biblical Concern
    A. Paul's Concern for the Redeemed (That Christ is in you)
    B. Paul's Concern for the Reprobates (Reprobates)

    Thanks for bearing with me.
    Dear Brother,
    Sounds like you and I are from about the same area, as far as "sermon style!" Personally, I preach both contextual, and topical messages. I'm not sure if that first term is the right one, but that's what came to mind.
    Some messages, (whether contextual, or topical,) are alliterated, and some are not. It just depends on how the LORD brings it out to me, either in reading, or personal study.
    Back when I first started preaching, I used to have everything in my head, with nothing written down! I quickly figured out, that, that doesn't work (for me!) Very seldom, do I have sub-points; and it depends on the message on how many points. I've had as few as three, and more than seven at times. Me being blind, I have my own way of outline organization! I usually have my point at the beginning of a line, with the corisponding scriptures or words after, and indented two spaces on any other lines needed! That way, all the points are right there, at the first of a line. If I get in a hurry, (and I tend to do that a lot,) I can see the points! This also helps if I'm more mobile, (which I also tend to be at times!) Again, sometimes more mobile than others. It all depends on how the LORD chooses to let me be; same issue with volume!
    I hope this made sence! I didn't mean to go on, but I just thought I'd tell you how this blind, old fashioned, fundamental, independent Baptist preacher does his outlines!
    BTW, where are you from in western NC? You may "private message" me with the answer, if you choose. I'll be in NC, LORD-willing a couple of times in May preaching! I'm looking forward to it!
    Oh, one more thing. I'm originally from the "Piedmont" area of NC;right outside of Greensboro!
    Last edited by OFIB Preacher; 03-16-2010 at 07:28 PM.
    http://www.sermon.net/thegladtidingsbroadcast
    Stay in the King James Bible, and stay on your knees!
    A man for whom Christ died,
    Josh

  7. #7
    Master of Fundamentalism
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fisherman View Post
    Sometimes they make a sermon easy to remember. However, it's painful when you can tell a point was forced just to make the sermon alliterated.
    That's my sticking point, as well. Alliteration can be helpful in remembering a sermon's main points, but most of the time, I would rather a more apt, non-alliterative word be used in those cases when (as you say) "the point is forced."

  8. #8
    Like It, Love it, Gotta Have It
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    Nov 2005
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    Chicago
    Posts
    8,667

    Default

    This is probably unique to me, but I can't stand alliterated outlines. To me they greatly distract from the truths being presented, and instead draw attention to the preacher himself. They seem to emphasize his ability as a wordsmith, and come across as cute and/or preacher-focusing in lieu of truth focusing.

    I've preached about 2700 times, and I think I've only preached one or two alliterated sermons, and those were alliterated accidentally.
    ...leave here; join this

    www.fundamentalforums.org

  9. #9
    Fundamental Thinker
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Ohio
    Posts
    1,310

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fisherman View Post
    Sometimes they make a sermon easy to remember. However, it's painful when you can tell a point was forced just to make the sermon alliterated.
    I agree and its not hard to tell when I preacher struggled to make the alliteration work.

    On measure, IMO not a bad way to structure a sermon.

  10. #10
    Like It, Love it, Gotta Have It
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    Rat Cheer
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    Default

    I have no problem with them, but then I'm functionally alliterate.

    You did ran very well, but the stubbing block got a hold of you. -- The Gory Gland

    In bible times, it was hard to give birth with pants on. But not today, for they all now have zippers. -- The Gory Gland

    I new that this reply was coming, but I did not know from which sinner.... -- The Gory Gland

 

 

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